5 Things Not To Do On LinkedIn

5 Things Not To Do On LinkedIn

Don’t make these common LinkedIn mistakes


Are you using LinkedIn effectively? With more than 350 million users, LinkedIn is one of the world’s largest on-line communities. It’s important that you use it responsibly so it can continue to be the powerful professional networking tool it was designed to be. Here’s five things you shouldn’t do on LinkedIn:

1. Don’t send random connection requests
Send connection requests in a mindful way. Think about why you want to connect with the person and personalise your connection request message by explaining why you think you should connect.

2. Don’t give fake endorsements
You should only endorse people for skills you know they have and generally speaking only for those skills you have witnessed first-hand. Don’t feel obligated to endorse your connections just because they have endorsed you or if LinkedIn suggests an endorsement.

3. Don’t be an over-poster
We’ve all seen them, the LinkedIn addicts who post multiple daily status updates, never-ending links to their latest blog or start countless discussion threads in groups. There’s definitely a fine line between using LinkedIn effectively and using LinkedIn aggressively.

4. Don’t send spam messages
We all get enough spam in our lives. Don’t be tempted to try and sell your latest idea to your connections through spammy private messages. It’s against LinkedIn policy, people don’t like it and you’ll find yourself losing connections very quickly.

5. Don’t be rude to recruiters
While recruiters are good connections to have when you’re looking for work, constant contact from them once you’ve landed your dream job can get annoying. The best thing to do is to place a message at the top of your Summary section stating that you are not looking for career opportunities at this time. That will let recruiters know you’re not on the market and should keep them at bay.

Lisa LaRue, MCareerDev, BSocSc(Couns&HumServ), DipCareerGuid,  RCDP, MAC is a Career Coach and Career Development Consultant at CareerWorx with more than 18 years’ experience helping people plan and manage their careers.
Lisa
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