interview skills

[caption id="attachment_18558" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Have you been here before?"] [/caption] There are a number of reasons people choose to apply for jobs they are overqualified for. It might be they want a job with less stress, less hours or less responsibility. Parents returning to work might prefer to ease themselves back into the workforce, high-flyers who have climbed the corporate ladder might want to take a backseat, or an academic could have a desire to broaden their experience. Applying for jobs for which you are overqualified can be a challenge since employers might make assumptions about you and your suitability for a role. Some assumptions could include: your salary expectations will be too high you won’t stick around, only staying until something better comes along you will be a threat to others in the organisation with less qualifications, skills and/or experience you'll want to make unwelcome changes you will be after their job   Here are some ideas for...

[caption id="attachment_18593" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] You have less than 8 seconds to create a good first impression[/caption] You might already be aware that you have less than 8 seconds to create a good first impression during a job interview. What you might not know is how to create a good first impression and be remembered a smartly dressed, well-presented professional. The Basics Avoid eating strongly flavoured foods before your interview. This is particularly important if your interview is scheduled after lunchtime. Stick with a simple sandwich or salad minus garlicky spreads or dressings. Be sure to check your teeth before the interview, that you have no food or lipstick stuck to them. Hair should be freshly washed and neatly styled. If you're a woman you might find wearing your hair in an up-style more manageable with the added benefit of removing the temptation of fussing with it before or during the interview. Women should stick to...

[caption id="attachment_18647" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Being prepared means having less stress"] [/caption] So, you’ve submitted your application and landed yourself an interview - congratulations! It’s not uncommon to feel a sense of panic set in as you realise you need to prepare for the all-important interview. But what exactly should you be doing in the lead up to the interview? RESEARCH THE COMPANY It’s important to research the company before the interview so you can prepare yourself to answer any questions. Adequate research will give you some insight into the various aspects of the company including its history, culture, aims, objectives and future plans. There are a number of ways to research a company but by far the easiest way is via the company’s own website. Seek out as much information as possible eg. read the company’s annual reports, published articles, reports, conference papers and marketing materials. You can also research a company via social...

[caption id="attachment_18655" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Asking the right questions in an interview is important[/caption] If you struggle when asked if you have any questions for the interviewer/s at the end of a job interview you're not alone. Many of us struggle to come up with intelligent and relevant questions at this most critical time. At the end of most job interviews, it’s likely you’ll be asked something like “Do you have any questions for us?” The wrong answer is: “No, I think you’ve covered everything.” The right answer is to ask relevant questions that demonstrate your genuine interest in the position. You can ask questions that relate to the company, the team or the role itself. Here are some examples of questions to ask at a job interview: Questions about the company [to help you learn more about the company including staff turnover, work environment/culture, challenges and future plans] How long have you worked for...