career coach Tag

[caption id="attachment_18485" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Should you be working part-time?"] [/caption] I was invited to speak on BBC Radio recently in response to a BBC article Three-day working week 'optimal for over-40s'. The article referred to a study undertaken by researchers at the Melbourne Institute at the University of Melbourne. Intrigued, I had to read the full working paper: Use It Too Much and Lose It? The Effect of Working Hours on Cognitive Ability. The findings of the study were that working up to 22-30 hours per week had a positive impact on the participants and that any hours worked in excess of this resulted in a negative impact on cognitive functioning. Why was this? It was discovered that stress and fatigue played a large part in impairing participants’ cognitive functioning. The study concluded that ‘too much work can have adverse effects on cognitive functioning’. This got me thinking about the many clients I...

[caption id="attachment_18493" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Be happy at work"] [/caption] Do more of what you love Re-crafting your work to do more of what you love can be simpler than you might think. Start by identifying what it is you enjoy most about your job. Even if you think there’s nothing you enjoy about your work think carefully and list those work tasks you enjoy the most. Now list the things you dislike about your job. Looking at this list, is there anything you can do differently? Can you do these tasks less frequently, more effectively or is it possible you can avoid these altogether by delegating or making changes to your role? Reconnect What attracted you to the job in the beginning? See if you can reconnect with what made the job attractive in the first place. If the reason was purely financial then honour that, think about all the benefits having this job...

[caption id="attachment_18497" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Don't make these common LinkedIn mistakes"] [/caption] Are you using LinkedIn effectively? With more than 546 million users (*as of 24 March 2018), LinkedIn is one of the world's largest on-line communities. It's important that you use it responsibly so it can continue to be the powerful professional networking tool it was designed to be. Here's five things you shouldn't do on LinkedIn: 1. Don’t send random connection requests Send connection requests in a mindful way. Think about why you want to connect with the person and personalise your connection request message by explaining why you think you should connect. 2. Don’t give fake endorsements You should only endorse people for skills you know they have and generally speaking only for those skills you have witnessed first-hand. Don’t feel obligated to endorse your connections just because they have endorsed you or if LinkedIn suggests an endorsement. 3. Don’t be an over-poster We’ve all seen them, the LinkedIn addicts who...

[caption id="attachment_16442" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Boost your career through networking"] [/caption] When I talk with my clients about how important networking is I’m often faced with a look of terror as they envisage themselves anxiously walking into a room full of strangers and awkwardly trying to network with them. I'm quick to reassure them that networking has changed a lot over the years and doesn't need to be the horrifying and daunting task they fear it will be. The biggest changes that have happened are the result of technological developments as well as the huge growth in range of networking opportunities. There really is something to suit everyone no matter how shy or lacking in confidence you might be. I prefer to look at networking as an opportunity to connect, learn and develop. Viewed in this way, networking becomes far less fearsome and much more fun. Now that’s got to be better than anxiousness,...

[caption id="attachment_18513" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="LinkedIn is a powerful networking tool"] [/caption] We've all done it. Logged in to LinkedIn, set up a profile, connected with some friends, old work colleagues maybe some family members and not returned for months or in some cases, years. The most common responses I get from people when I ask them if they're on LinkedIn are: "Oh yeah I am, I have a profile but it's not up to date and I haven't been on there for years." "I used to be on LinkedIn but I didn't see the point of it so I deleted my account." The whole premise behind LinkedIn is that it is a professional networking tool. But the thing is, if you are not using it to its full potential, it fails to be effective. That's no fault of the tool itself, but of the user of the tool - that's you and me. So what exactly...

[caption id="attachment_18523" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Do you have an elevator pitch ready for when the opportunity arises?"] [/caption] What is an elevator pitch? The term elevator pitch evolved as a way to describe a 30 second spiel about who you are, what you have to offer and why someone should hire you. The premise is that if you were ever lucky enough to share a 30 second elevator ride with someone with the potential to hire you, you could confidently describe why they should. How do I create a good elevator pitch? By far the easiest and most effective way to create your own elevator pitch is to first identify your unique selling points. Try brainstorming on a sheet of paper or digitally if you prefer. Identify all those things that describe your skills, abilities, experience, interests, passions etc. Think about your accomplishments and include these in your pitch to really make you stand out. Have...

[caption id="attachment_16177" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="It's good to have an up to date CV ready to send to potential employers"] [/caption] 1. Age or date of birth There is no need to include your age or date of birth in your CV since age discrimination legislation dictates that employers cannot discriminate based on a person’s age. 2. Meaningless career objective One of the things that annoy employers and recruiters the most is meaningless career objective statements. You know the ones: ‘A hard-working individual looking to join a progressive organisation where I can further develop my skills’....

[caption id="attachment_18136" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="If your job is affecting your health it might be time to move on"] [/caption] When your job begins to impact on your physical or mental health it could be a sign that it’s time to reassess your career. Some people report feeling physically sick at the thought of going into work, feeling unwell the whole time they were at work or suffering from a range of other symptoms of stress, depression or anxiety. They reasons they attribute it to their jobs is that once away from their work environment, the symptoms either diminish or disappear altogether. Whatever the cause for your decline in physical or mental health, it’s something you shouldn’t ignore. The first step should always be to contact your GP. Once you have the all clear from your GP, it’s worth taking a look at the reasons why you feel your physical or mental health...

[caption id="attachment_18534" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Optimising your CV is the best way to ensure you get your next interview"] [/caption] 1. Layout Rather than try and fill every inch of the page, allow some white space so the reader can comfortably read your CV. Adjust the spacing of your document where necessary to make sections easier to identify and read. Make sure you set your margins wide enough to allow space around the borders of the page and if including a footer, be sure there is enough space between it and the body of your CV. 2. Title If you have significant skills and experience, a good way for you to stand out from the crowd is to insert a title near the top of your CV.  For example, you could include a title like: Experienced Management Accountant to instantly brand yourself as such. 3. Keywords One of the biggest mistakes people make is neglecting to include relevant...

[caption id="attachment_18541" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Approach interviews with confidence"] [/caption] You’ve landed the interview, done your research, practised answering potential interview questions and now the big moment has arrived. Here’s five practical ways you can overcome job interview nerves: 1. Visualise In the days leading up to and right before the job interview, visualise your interview unfolding beautifully. See yourself answering the interview questions eloquently and with confidence. Imagine your interviewer’s smiling faces, their satisfaction with your brilliant responses and generally how well things are going.  It might sound very alternative, but many highly successful executives and elite athletes frequently use and recommend visualisation techniques to achieve goals. 2. Breathe If you suffer from pre-interview stress and anxiety it’s likely you will benefit from controlled breathing technique to help calm your nerves. You've probably heard of the ‘fight-or-flight’ response which happens when we perceive we are in danger. Stress and anxiety responses often result in shallow...