employment Tag

[caption id="attachment_18425" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Hiding won't help!"][/caption] The biggest fear interviewees have not having the ‘right’ answers. The best way to overcome this is to consider the kinds of questions your interviewers are likely to ask and to think about how you will respond. Let’s look at some typical interview questions that leave interviewers shifting uncomfortably in their seats and how best to answer them. What do you know about us and what we do? Many hiring managers cite this as one of the most critical questions asked when interviewing candidates. One manging director went so far as to say that if a candidate was unable to answer this question appropriately it was a deal breaker. No matter how well they performed throughout the rest of the interview, they would not be hired. What is the right approach to responding to this question? Firstly, you will need to have done your homework by spending...

[caption id="attachment_18465" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="There are over 350 different job roles across the NHS"][/caption] The NHS is one of the biggest employers in the world with over 1.6 million employees. When thinking about the health service, most people primarily think of doctors and nurses, but there’s a whole network within the organisation consisting of different roles - including non-medical. From the caterers who provide daily nutritious meals and skilled security personnel ensuring everyone is safe, there are also Human Resources departments focusing on retaining staff and keeping employee morale high. Working for the NHS can lead to a rewarding career, with benefits including flexible working options, pensions and opportunities to progress. Knowing you have contributed towards helping someone’s health can be also offer job satisfaction that you won’t receive in a regular office position. In order to treat millions more patients, there is an increased need for more professionals to join the healthcare sector....

[caption id="attachment_18485" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Should you be working part-time?"] [/caption] I was invited to speak on BBC Radio recently in response to a BBC article Three-day working week 'optimal for over-40s'. The article referred to a study undertaken by researchers at the Melbourne Institute at the University of Melbourne. Intrigued, I had to read the full working paper: Use It Too Much and Lose It? The Effect of Working Hours on Cognitive Ability. The findings of the study were that working up to 22-30 hours per week had a positive impact on the participants and that any hours worked in excess of this resulted in a negative impact on cognitive functioning. Why was this? It was discovered that stress and fatigue played a large part in impairing participants’ cognitive functioning. The study concluded that ‘too much work can have adverse effects on cognitive functioning’. This got me thinking about the many clients I...

[caption id="attachment_18534" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Optimising your CV is the best way to ensure you get your next interview"] [/caption] 1. Layout Rather than try and fill every inch of the page, allow some white space so the reader can comfortably read your CV. Adjust the spacing of your document where necessary to make sections easier to identify and read. Make sure you set your margins wide enough to allow space around the borders of the page and if including a footer, be sure there is enough space between it and the body of your CV. 2. Title If you have significant skills and experience, a good way for you to stand out from the crowd is to insert a title near the top of your CV.  For example, you could include a title like: Experienced Management Accountant to instantly brand yourself as such. 3. Keywords One of the biggest mistakes people make is neglecting to include relevant...

[caption id="attachment_16775" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Thinking of changing career?"] [/caption] Changing jobs is challenging enough but changing to a whole new career can be overwhelming.  One of the biggest hurdles faced by career changers is how to make a smooth and successful transition to their new career.  To help, we’ve put together this step-by-step guide to make the transition to your new career an easier one. Research A vital first step in changing careers is to research your new career. Speak to people in the industry to gain a realistic insight in to the culture, conditions, opportunities and challenges. As part of your research you should aim to identify any skills gaps, transferable skills and any qualifications or certifications required for your new career. Find out what others in your chosen new career have done for example, what are their backgrounds? What was their progression route? What qualifications do they have? Develop a plan A good...

[caption id="attachment_18647" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Being prepared means having less stress"] [/caption] So, you’ve submitted your application and landed yourself an interview - congratulations! It’s not uncommon to feel a sense of panic set in as you realise you need to prepare for the all-important interview. But what exactly should you be doing in the lead up to the interview? RESEARCH THE COMPANY It’s important to research the company before the interview so you can prepare yourself to answer any questions. Adequate research will give you some insight into the various aspects of the company including its history, culture, aims, objectives and future plans. There are a number of ways to research a company but by far the easiest way is via the company’s own website. Seek out as much information as possible eg. read the company’s annual reports, published articles, reports, conference papers and marketing materials. You can also research a company via social...